Kenny Schick - 'The Ghost of Nashville'

Reviewed by Aaron Cloutier & Staff


Clean guitar lines and a Neil Young meets Cat Stevens style vocal sets the tone for “The Ghost Of Nashville.” A folky lament of sorts for the days that used to be. The lyrics though softly sung, are full of vitriol and wistfulness and makes for a nice contrast. The lines that grabbed my attention in particular were:


“Rats on Broadway spreading the disease

and rotten fruit was falling from the trees

good ‘ol boys with swollen pride

was this the day the music died

the streets fell silent, the drunks had had their fill in The Ghost of Nashville”


There's a great sense of imagery and storytelling going on with the lyrical content that immediately roped me at once. From what I gather, it takes the perspective of an observer witnessing his beloved city as it loses its soul to the times.

Musically, a great sonic tapestry is woven around the melancholy subject matter throughout the piece. In addition to the intimate vocal stylings, tremolo soaked guitar lines are woven with clean finger-picked passages which serve to create a great sense of texture as a steady train beat played out on a snare ties everything together.


It’s clear that these are seasoned musicians and there’s a lot of great playing going on here. The inclusion of female vocal accompaniment makes for some great harmonies during the chorus. I personally enjoy the dynamic build of the song as it reaches a crescendo towards the 2:00 mark as crash cymbals resound while guitars grow in intensity.

In short, if intimate style singer/songwriter folk tinged music with poignant lyrics, textured guitar elements, and a warm and welcoming mix is your thing, then Kenny Schick's music is a must for your playlist.


For more information on Kenny Schick, please visit his website.


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About Kenny


Kenny Schick might get labeled a singer/songwriter simply because he plays solo, his weathered acoustic guitar supporting his lilting tenor vocal, but Schick has a loyal following because those who experience his shows find a lot more ‘under the hood’ than just another guy with a guitar could ever provide. Schick’s audiences feel this passion – the experience of decades of performance in every imaginable genre and the observations of one who takes the sometimes tumultuous road less traveled. At Kenny’s shows, there is laughter, tears, musical craftsmanship, and thought provoking lyricism. The shows take listeners on a journey and includes them, with much banter back and forth.

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